Would-be sleuths, investigators and detectives will get a chance to practice their skills with an interactive exhibit based upon the CBS hit television series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois.

Fans of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, will enjoy the new interactive exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. Learn to solve mysteries as a crime scene investigator, using forensics, scientific principles and real investigative techniques.

The exhibit was put together with input from investigators from the television show, CSI and real life forensic science experts Visitors get the chance to solve crime scene mysteries with interactive exhibit.

The exiting exhibit runs from May 25 to September 3.

In CSI: The Experience, visitors will enter one of three different crime scenes, begin to identify evidence and record findings on a special investigation card…endeavoring to crack the case.After leaving the crime scene, the sleuthing continues. There is a large wall of crime scene photos to track down any missed clues. The analyzing and testing of evidence takes place in two highly interactive lab areas. Evidence, such as blood alcohol levels, DNA, fingerprints, and more will take place. in the lab. The three crime scenes and investigative techniques include the following.

A House Collided: The window of the quiet suburban house has been run through by a car. There is a man in the driver’s seat, seat beat on and slumped over. The windshield is shattered, the car door shut. There are muddy shoe prints in the living room, drops of blood, an open pizza box, a beer bottles and a hand print on the hood of the car. The investigation will compare fingerprints, examine blood spatter patterns, observe the victim’s shows and tracks, compare fiber evidence, analyze the victim’s blood-alcohol level, compare DNA and discover the cause of death.

Who Got Served? In an alley behind a old Las Vegas motel, is the body of a young woman, sprawled under a trash dumpster, wearing a waitress uniform and a named’s that reads “Penny”. the body has a tire tread across the abdomen, but there are no other visible injuries. Tossed nearby is a photo of her which has been torn in half. A cell phone and handbag are in the trash. The investigation will include cell phone, contents of the handbag, inspecting the purse and head shots, fingerprints, establishing cause of death, DNA samples, and discovering the cause of death.

No Bones About It!: A hiker stumbles what appears to be a.human skull sticking out of the ground, partially buried. There are other bones scattered in the dirt. There is a visible in the skull, tattered remnants of a coat and what looks like a backpack. The investigation includes analyzing the bullet, airs, a seed found in the coat pockets, DNA from the tooth, DNA from an animal hair, examining a femur bone to establish the victim’s height and discovering the cause of death.

There is a link from the Museum Science and Industry website (msichicago.org) to an interactive web game (forensics.rice.edu) to practice investigative techniques on the web. Web sleuths are presented with clues and get a chance to sharpen their skills on-line via computer.

After cracking the case, sleuths will present their findings in a recreation of the office of Gill Grissom, the CSI head investigator. Sleuths answer a series of multiple choice questions on touch screen, based upon scientific findings. After completing the questions, a case summary is generated and results are compared to expert crime scene investigators.

The Museum of Science and Industry, The American Academy of Forensic Sciences, CBS, and Rice University Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning partnered in this endeavor, which is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundations.

The Museum of Science and Industry is located at 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 773-684-1414.

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